Corporate Social Responsibility

Corporate Social Responsibility

Equality of opportunity

MEGT supports equal employment opportunities for all

Use the section from the RAP here.

Here are some tips to help you to write a winning resume.

First Australians

MEGT recognises that local communities underpin our work and strives to address the under-representation of Aboriginal people in the workforce by a deliberate policy of investment in Aboriginal Australian relationships.

Our Indigenous Employment and Liaison Policy focuses on education and employment of Aboriginal Australians and addressing their specific needs.

MEGT is committed to building long term relationships with individuals, local groups and organisations representing Aboriginal Australians through the improvement of our understanding of the needs of these communities and, with their input, direction and collaboration, identifying ways we can either auspice or provide ways to increase their participation in meaningful, rewarding careers.

In 2014 MEGT was selected to be the VTEC provider for Victoria. The MEGT VTEC works with the Victorian Indigenous community and business to place indigenous people into ongoing meaningful employment. The VTEC works closely with indigenous jobseekers to train and support them into specific jobs. The businesses involved in the VTEC are committed to “bridging the gap” of indigenous people in the workforce and provide mentors, on-the-job training and a career path. MEGT is very proud to be the only VTEC provider in Victoria and is working hard to make the VTEC a success.

Follow this link to read about MEGT Statement of Commitment and Reconciliation Action Plan. [LINK TO FIRST AUSTRALIANS LANDING PAGE]

 

Employment opportunities for young people

MEGT supports the Australian School-based Apprenticeships program to help young Australians step into a career stream while gaining credit for their years 11 and 12 studies.

MEGT provides school talks about the benefits of Australian Apprenticeships and helps connect schools with employers and lists of vacancies to schools for exiting students.

Employment opportunities for mature aged people

Copy to go here from the FOR EMPLOYERS section

Community partnerships

  • MEGT supported Sue Kent to work on a Rural Development Program in the Solomon Island as part of a World Bank program. Sue’s role was to write a course to assist “Technical Community Helpers” gain the skills they need for their role in the community. MEGT released Sue from her normal role of Program Manager to undertake this work and provided resource support.
  • In cooperation with Bizlinks, MEGT promoted school and business links in Maroondah with community breakfasts.
  • MEGT has judged for the Victorian State Trainee of the Year Awards and for the Bendigo and Echuca Loddon Shire Business Excellence Awards.
  • MEGT’s Business Relationships Consultants often assist with resume writing and mock interviews at interested schools to assist students in gaining skills that will assist them to become ‘job ready’.
    Staff often attend school career nights and career expositions to help students make decisions about their future
  • MEGT, Stocklands and Porter Davis Homes, along with funding from SkillsVic, built six houses in eastern Melbourne, employing 15 apprentices and trainees and selling the houses at a socially affordable price and resulted in ongoing employment opportunities for the local community.
  • MEGT works with Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities and stakeholder groups on projects to provide equal employment opportunities.

MEGT committee involvement

  • Australian Council for Private Education and Training (Vic)
  • Australian Council for Private Education and Training (National)
    Australian Business Chamber
  • NSW Department of Education and Training Vocational Training Tribunal
  • Vocational Training Appeals Panel
  • Group Training Australia Victoria (Board Member – Sue Kent)
  • Jobs Australia
  • Outer Eastern Local Learning and Employment Network (past)
  • National Australian Apprenticeships Centre Industry Forum
  • Australian Apprenticeships Centre National Reference Group
  • National Employment Services Association (NESA)
  • Echuca and Swan Hill Local Learning and Employment Network (past)
  • Ballarat Local Learning and Employment Network sub committee (past)
  • Committee of Management, Australian Technical College Eastern Melbourne (past)
  • Committee of Management of Automotive & Manufacturing Technology Centre (past)
  • Group Training Australia NSW
  • Network for Educational Workplacements Committee
  • Management Committee overseeing the work placement of 3,500 NSW vocational education students in years 11 and 12 through the previous Local Community Partnership in NSW.
  • Maroondah Careers Group
  • David Windridge is a Fellow of the Group Training Association of Victoria.
  • Nicole Gayewski is the Director for ACPET representing Tasmania.

Worldskills competitions

MEGT is involved in the national annual awards for all apprentices and trainees.

Charitable support

  • Sydney Children’s Hospital
    Annually
    The MEGT Children’s Services team raises money for the Children’s Hospital each year and MEGT corporate matches every dollar raised by staff throughout Australia.
  • Building water tanks for Tanzanian schools
    19th March 2013
    MEGT Institute, Ability English, Suplove and Freshie raised money from a sausage sizzle at MEGT’s newly renovated campus in Quay Street, Sydney towards the building of two water tanks in Africa.
  • MEGT Institute staff members and their friends are building schools in Tanzania and the schools need water for the students.
  • Bush fire recovery
    8 April 2013
    Following the extraordinary bushfires in the normally cool climate and verdant Sorell region of Tasmania, MEGT staff raised money towards helping repair a community reserve area with the assistance of Sorell Council.
    The MEGT organisation dollar-matched the contribution made by staff through casual clothes day donations to take the total amount donated to $2,377.90.
  • Delegation from Mindanao
    October 2012
    MEGT showcased Australia’s group training model of education leading to employment to delegates from Mindanao in the Philippines. The delegates are part of the Australian Leadership Award Fellowship, sponsored by AusAid. The Philippine government was looking for ways to increase vocational skills of its workforce in order to provide more employment opportunities to its people and to help its local businesses to grow. The MEGT group training model is considered world’s best practice.
  • Maldives study tour
    April 2012
    MEGT hosted a delegation from the Maldives at our Bowen Hills office in Queensland. The purpose of the tour is ‘Developing assistance in establishing an apprenticeship framework and industry linkage system for improved Vocational Education and Training in the Maldives’. Key industry focus is on Tourism and Hospitality, Construction, Transport, Social and Health Sector (community services), Fisheries and Agriculture.
  • Wall of Hands
    March 2012
    MEGT supports ‘The Wall of Hands’ campaign (18th June until 9th September 2012) that seeks public support to continue meeting the overwhelming demand to help for Indigenous Australians to access vital literacy and numeracy skills.
  • Good Friday Appeal
    April 2012
    MEGT has contributed to the Good Friday Appeal to assist the Royal Melbourne Children’s hospital.
  • Oxfam Trailwalker Melbourne
    April 2012
    Melbourne staff ‘The Yack Pack’, raise $2,000 for Oxfam through sponsorship of their 48 hour walk of the 100km trail from Wheelers Hill to Wesburn Park in the Yarra Valley. MEGT doubles the value of donations raised by staff by dollar matching.
  • Colombian government
    March 2012
    MEGT Institute, together with Box Hill TAFE, showed a delegation from the Colombian leadership group, our vocational systems, processes and training facilities. The leadership group is researching ways to improve the education and social systems of Colombia. Diana Naranjo, MEGT’s Student Support Services Officer from our Swanston Street campus, was on hand to assist with any of the tricky translations from Australian vernacular.
  • Sunsuper Ride to Conquer Cancer
    2011 and 2012
    Staff raised money for the Chris O’Brien Lifehouse at Royal Prince Alfred Hospital through sponsorships of his 200km bike ride. MEGT doubled the value of donations raised by staff by dollar matching.
  • Flood relief in Queensland
    2011
    Queensland staff volunteers assisted their communities to clean up after the floods. Staff from around Australia also donated money towards the Premier’s fund and MEGT doubled the value of their contributions by dollar matching money raised.
  • Bushfire Disaster Relief Fund
    2009
    MEGT staff and organisation donated $32,124 to Red Cross to assist communities affected by the February 2009 bushfires. Staff also made personal contributions and donated a large amount of goods to the RSPCA to support their work in assisting distressed and injured birds and animals.
  • South African sponsorship
    MEGT assisted the Republic of South Africa introduce a Group Training program to the country to provide access to employment and training in order to improve life and work skills that can lead to improved standards of living.
  • Tsunami
    May 2005
    In May 2005 staff combined with MEGT’s donation to World Vision, Red Cross and Care and to the National Heroes Foundation, Sri Lanka to contribute towards the building of a house in a Rehab Village.
    MEGT also joined ACPET‘s Tsunami fund where the money was put towards providing alternative educational opportunities for students at a number of Aceh schools which were destroyed.
  • Annual hampers
    Food hampers donated by MEGT staff are provided to Eastern Anglicare Victoria each Christmas.
  • Bedford
    Annual ongoing support
    The Adelaide Australian Apprenticeships team supports Bedford’s activities in encouraging employers to take on people with a disability as Australian Apprentices.
  • Run for Kids
    2008 and 2009
    The Melbourne Group Training team participated in the Citylink Run For Kids in 2008 and 2009 in order to raise money for the Children’s Hospital.
  • Uganda
    2008 and September 2010
    An MEGT Institute staff member used his skills in 2008 and 2010 to build classrooms for severely disadvantaged communities in eastern Uganda.
  • World Vision
    Ongoing support
    Staff direct debit some of their pay to sponsor a World Vision child and to provide three primary school Educational Sponsorships through the Smith Family.
  • Regional support
    Ongoing
    Regional staff are involved in
    – Apex and Rotary memberships
    – membership of local community sporting groups
    – local Chamber of Commerce memberships.
  • Ashman Grove
    December 2014
    The SA staff  connected with their local Aged Care facility – Ashman Grove, to help with the set up of the Christmas lunch for the residents.
  • January 2015
    A staff member with his family participated in Ride the Night for Youth Support + Advocacy Service- a 70 kilometre bike ride around Melbourne, from midnight till dawn.
    MEGT dollar matched staff donations.
  • Blue Shirt Day
    December 2014
    MEGT and staff raised money for men’s mental health.
  • Global Outreach
    July 2014
    Staff pooled their knowledge at the Charlton Brown trivia night to support Australian students to travel to develop their skills to assist orphanages and aged care centres.
  • Epilepsy Action Australia
    June 2014
    Staff raised money for Epilepsy Action Australia and MEGT dollar matched money raised.
  • Biggest Morning Tea
    June 2014
    Staff across Australia raised money for cancer research and MEGT dollar matched money raised.

Treading softly

Wherever possible, MEGT tries to reduce its impact on the environment by

  • providing shredded paper to local pet shops
  • maintaining a fleet of gas-powered vehicles
  • encouraging double siding of paper copying
  • using hand dryers instead of paper towells
  • recycling paper
  • installing where possible motion detector lighting.
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Accuracy

Your resume is a legal document and the information on it needs to be accurate and up to date. Later at interview or reference stage this information will be verified so don’t exaggerate your experience or skill set and definitely do not put anything on your CV that is not true.

Make sure your contact information is correct and up to date – there is no point even sending your CV if the employer can’t reach you! List your name, address, phone number and email address.

How it looks

Ensure that your resume is short and sweet, usually no more that 2 pages. Only put information that is required and keep it concise.

Make sure your CV looks good both printed and on screen: white background and black font. Keep to standard font sizes and styles. Using different size fonts, font type and colours can make it difficult to read.

Use business language and make sure you check and double check for spelling and grammatical errors.  Also make sure you get someone else to look over your CV – a second pair of eyes may pick up something that you have missed.

Adding a career objective or personal profile at the top of your CV will give the employer a brief idea of who you are and what you are looking for – but make sure the information is about you not just something copied from a CV template on the Internet.

Your education and skills

List your education from most recent to least. State the education provider and the name of the course completed. Make sure you add dates of completion for all education or ‘at present’ if you are still studying.

Previous experience

List your employment from most recent.

State the business name and your job title and for each role you have had, add a couple of brief bullet points explaining the duties/ responsibilities of the role.

If you haven’t been working yet make sure you list any work experience, volunteer work or extra curricular activity such as coaching kids sports teams, tutoring etc.

It is important to separate work experience, paid work and volunteer work.

Be sure to list any special skills such as a second language or specific computer software, etc. If you have a white card, green card, Driver Licence this is where you can add it.

References

When listing referees make sure the contact details are accurate and up to date, that your referees are aware they are listed on your CV and that they can expect to receive calls from prospective employers. Your referees should be a supervisor or manager from a recent position.

If you have not had a job yet, ask your Year Advisor or someone from your community who has known you for some time, to act as a personal reference.

Your interests

You can add activities and interests if you like. Many employers like to get an idea of who you are and your life outside work. Photos are generally not recommended or needed.

Cover letter

Prepare a brief cover letter that is written specifically for each application because it does not look as though you are particularly interested in the job you are applying for when you have addressed it to the wrong company or person or if you have stated your passion for the wrong job!

Get ready for a phone call

Once you have sent out your resume, the job application process has started. Make sure you keep your phone with you and if you can’t answer straight away make sure you call people back. Ensure your voicemail is business-like and always answer the phone in a way that demonstrates your maturity  – even if your friends have a bit of a laugh at you.

Take notes on the roles you have applied for and if you do get a call back, refer back to them – even if you are applying for multiple roles, the interviewer likes to think that theirs is the only role you have applied for.

When you do receive a phone call be polite and be prepared to answer questions, this is part of the interview process and is called phone screening. Give detailed answers and be prepared to explain why you are interested in the position.

Be prepared for knock backs, everyone gets them, but stay positive and take any feedback given as constructive criticism – use it to improve for next time.

It is not unusual for people not to call you back about your application. There are often hundreds of applicants for the one position and it is quite normal these days for an employer to only call those they wish to interview.

Your resume is often your first and only introduction to a prospective employer. Taking the time to create a quality resume will result in more call backs and greater opportunity to land the job of your dreams. Please see below for examples of a resume and cover letter.

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Come prepared

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Do your research on the company, the industry and the apprenticeship/traineeship you have applied for.

Learn as much as you can about what the company does as their core business.

  • What do they make or sell?
  • What industry do they operate within?
  • Where is the business located?
  • What kind of duties do you expect to be undertaking within the company?

Find out what to take to the interview and learn what the structure of the interview will be.

Take along your portfolio as evidence of your experience, skills and achievements which may be relevant to the apprenticeship/traineeship.

Your portfolio should include:

  • your resume and application for employment
  • your career history including any certificates or documents which you may have obtained in past jobs, school or in your private life (from weekend sports, hobbies or volunteer work) and
  • any paperwork or tests you have been asked to bring along.

Don't be late

Know how to get to the interview and how you will get there. Double check the address of where the interview will be held and make sure you know how to get there. Pre-plan your transport for the day. If catching public transport, make sure you arrive at your destination with at least 10 minutes to spare. If you’re still unsure, time how long it takes to get there with your selected mode of transport a few days before the interview.

Research the company

Find out as much as you can about the company through websites and news articles etc. Your effort will show in the job interview, and you’ll be seen as proactive, hardworking and astute.

Practice makes perfect

Practice the interview with family or friends. Consider some questions the interviewer may ask you and prepare a response for each. Get your family/friends to ask the questions and practice your answer until you feel confident.

Common questions include:

  • Why do you want to do this type of work? What sort of experience do you have?
  • Do you have a driver’s licence?
  • How will you get to work?
  • What are your plans after the apprenticeship/traineeship?
  • Do you have any questions?
  • Why did you leave your previous role? (always be positive abut previous employers and colleagues)

Looking good

Dress appropriately and ensure your personal presentation is business-like.

Start planning what you’re going to wear at least two days before your scheduled interview. This will give you enough time to get something appropriate in case your chosen outfit does not go to plan.

Have your final outfit ready and out the night before and take care of any last minute ironing of clothing or cleaning of shoes if required.

Make sure your outfit is suitable for the occasion – overdressed is always better than underdressed.

No scruffy jeans, no thongs, no dirty joggers, and no “out there” clothing or accessories which are inappropriate or may be distracting.

Keep it simple but presentable – something that will impress your interviewer/s.

Making an entrance

Make sure you arrive around 10-15 minutes before the interview to starts while taking care not to arrive too early as the interviewer will not be ready for you. This will give you time to gather your thoughts and double check your appearance.

Introduce yourself to the receptionist, tell them of your appointment time and that you’re attending an interview for an apprenticeship/traineeship with their company. If you know who to ask for, tell the receptionist at this time also. If you’re not sure who you will be meeting, ask the receptionist and try to remember their names for when you meet with them. Remember to speak clearly and politely and to listen to the receptionist’s instructions on where to wait for the interview.

Try to make a great impression to everyone you meet, they may be your future colleague. More often than not the interviewer will ask whoever greeted you, what they thought of you.

Mobile off

Turn your mobile phone off or put it on silent.
There is nothing more distracting for yourself or your interviewer than if your phone goes off midway through an interview.

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Know your key strengths

Be prepared to discuss in detail your strengths, your personal attributes and skills with examples. These should be the ultimate reason you get the job over someone else. Assuming you have researched the company, these strengths should also be closely aligned to what the employer is looking for. These could be attention to detail, problems solving skills, customer service, communication skills etc.

How to answer the questions

Listen carefully to the questions the interviewer is asking you. When answering questions, take a moment to think about the question and how best to respond. There’s no rush. If you’re unsure what the question means, ask the interviewer to clarify. The interviewer will be happy to help you out. Make sure your answers are straight to the point and address the question asked. Always include an example of how you have done something in the past and what the final result was.
Remain attentive

Stay alert during the interview, maintain eye contact with your interviewer as much as possible, sit up straight and present a positive, confident attitude when you answer questions. Remember your mannerisms can say more than your words do. Make sure you remain enthusiastic throughout the entire interview.

Evaluation for improvement

If you are unsuccessful with the position, seek feedback regarding areas for improvement.

Look at the interview experience in a positive light – take it as a learning experience and something to help you in the future.

Take a look at all the tips provided above and ensure you meet the requirements for each.

How to conclude

Listen carefully to the questions the interviewer is asking you. When answering questions, take a moment to think about the question and how best to respond. There’s no rush. If you’re unsure what the question means, ask the interviewer to clarify. The interviewer will be happy to help you out. Make sure your answers are straight to the point and address the question asked. Always include an example of how you have done something in the past and what the final result was.
Remain attentive

Stay alert during the interview, maintain eye contact with your interviewer as much as possible, sit up straight and present a positive, confident attitude when you answer questions. Remember your mannerisms can say more than your words do. Make sure you remain enthusiastic throughout the entire interview.

Sell yourself


For employers

Australian Apprenticeships are the best way to combine training and employment and lead to a nationally recognised qualification. Apprenticeships and traineeships are jobs that combine paid work and structured training. They involve paid employment

Find out more
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If you believe in yourself and what you can achieve, you will feel naturally confident without appearing to be a smart aleck. With this in mind, think about each question you are asked and how you can answer in a way that builds their confidence in you.

Tell the interviewer of your skills, interests and past experiences as relevant to the position. Reinforce WHY you want the position.

Do NOT lie – the interviewer will find out one way or another if you do.

Everyone appreciates it when you are genuinely interested in them and their business achievements. By showing enthusiasm and interest – and letting them know you are willing to learn and progress your skills with their help, you will be building their confidence in you as a potential reliable employee.

At the end of the interview ask any questions you may have regarding the position or the company.

The interviewer will be more than happy to answer anything you ask them, it also shows that you have an interest in the role.

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